COLLECTION

Ankara Orchard House collection contains etnographic pieces from daily life, reflecting spatial and social characteristics of 19th and early 20th Century Ankara and what "life at orchard house " felt like as an indispensable part of the lifestyle of the day.

The upper floor of the Orchard House is designed and furnished with a perspective reflecting the house life in the decades of transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Republic. The placement of furniture and accessories in various styles represent the co-existence of the traditional lifestyle with the contemporary one. Divans extend one step higher than the floor level under the windows through the whole length of the walls of the hall, which is also used as a seating and gathering place. Divans are reserved for the elderly and the guests, while bentwood chairs placed side by side are for the children to use. The mid-wall running through the sofa stands also as the base of a wooden console carrying a gabled mirror. There are two large brass charcoal burners in the middle. The dining room contains the floor table with a copper tray, as well as nightstand with a gramophone on top, as well as a wooden sofa for two, covered with tapestry. The living room where the members of the family gather and spend time in ordinary days is also a venue for the playing of traditional music and listening to gramophone records. A brass bedstead, wooden towel rails with toneth feet, bassinet, and a dresser are all the furniture in a given bedroom.  

legant pieces of the copper goods collection, silk pouch collection, Ottoman-Çanakkale ceramics collection, and carpets collection of Semahat Arsel, the Chair of Vehbi Koç Foundation (VKV), her late husband Dr. Nusret Arsel, who personally assisted the specialists during the repairs of the orchard house and the preparation of the interiors, are also on display.

A few items from of Ankara Orchard House Collection

Semahat & Dr. Nusret Arsel Copper Collection

The use of copper for making items dates back to the earliest days of human history. It was widely used to make often used kitchenware in particular. The tray-table tradition was based on a large copper tray to serve food in copper pans, bowls, and plates. Liquids such as ayran and fruit stew would be consumed in copper bowls and cups. After the dinner, a copper basin and kettle would show up for handwash. Coffee would be cooked in copper pots, on charcoal stoves. Copper played a prominent role in Turkish baths as well. Bath bowls, as well as ornate boxes used to store clay, soap, scrub mitts and wash clothes, of various designs and decorational patterns were only a few of the precious items used in daily life.

Çanakkale Ceramics

The partially glazed earthenware pots of interesting forms but relatively limited patterns, which were usually dried with the help of a slow-burning fire, and which are produced even today in various corners and parts of Anatolia, are known to date fairly back in Çanakkale. The ceramic items made often of red clay and usually with single-color glazing have served mostly as memorabilia, rather than for daily use.

Pouches

Pouches are accessories which saw rather popular use in daily life in the olden days, as a means to carry coins around.

Some pouches were knit with needles or were point-lace works, made of various colors of silk and cotton. Others were made of fabrics such as satin or silk. They were adorned with plant, flower, bird, and rooster patterns, as well as symmetrical patterns, scales, and beads. Pouches are authentic pieces of handicrafts and were traditionally given to the bride and groom as wedding presents, as well as birth presents for newborn, with a few coins to boot.

You can search the samples in Orchard House digital collections.

Semahat & Dr. Nusret Arsel Copper Collection
Çanakkale Ceramics
Pouches
VEKAM